Inside the DClinPsy: Snippets from an assistant psychologists’ group

Aspiring clinical psychologists are aflutter with questions- how to get on training, what the role is like, and truly- is it worth it? A few months ago I made a discovery, albeit quite late, that provides some answers: most cities have a pre-training or assistant psychologists’ chapter or group, with a BPS compiled list which,…

“How can I change?”: A South Asian carer’s story

Over samosas and mithai, for a standard case study, an elderly South Asian woman narrated her experience as sole carer for her husband who had dementia. Her story was rife with cultural abuse that is mitigated under the guise of cultural sensitivity, while culture is ignored where it’s truly needed. I’ve spoken about culture and how…

A story of oranges and dementia: Learning about living with it with ARUK

A month ago a video went viral, asking everyone to #ShareTheOrange. It was created by Alzheimer’s Research UK, UKs number one fundraising charity for dementia research. It manifested curiosity, begging the question “What does an orange have to do with dementia?” As the intricately crafted video states, dementia is most commonly caused by Alzheimer’s Disease…

Insert fancy title: What I learnt from rejected manuscripts

It’s disheartening, going through the toils of writing your research into a paper and having fellow authors,  supervisors and journals demand major revisions. It can takes months to account for those corrections, and still end in rejection. It stirs up serious impostor syndrome. We’re told overcoming this leads to being a better writer, something every academic…

Avoiding gibberish when assessing for dementia

At the inception of a new year, I’m looking back on one of my favourite pieces of work from 2017, which was commended and a joint runner up for the Max Perutz Award, detailed in my previous post: