Dementia: Let’s talk about it

Dementia-and-hearing-lossAll around me I see people who are being affected by dementia and they have so many questions. The answers are out there but they can become mixed up and muddled. Therefore, for Dementia Awareness Week I’d like to talk a bit about dementia and what we can do about it.  Continue reading “Dementia: Let’s talk about it”

Book Review: The Skeleton Cupboard

20170509_190139I promised to review this book so let’s start by asking “Who is The Skeleton Cupboard for?” Hyperbole aside it is a must read for every aspiring psychologist, meriting a place on our undergraduate reading lists and if clinical psychology is your calling its contents will have you salivating:

“I first became fascinated by the frontal lobes of the human brain when I saw my grandmother’s sprayed across the skirting board…” Continue reading “Book Review: The Skeleton Cupboard”

The little boy with the knife

can-stock-photo_csp12353142Someone pulls a knife on you. Do you imagine a dark street with a hooded figure emptying your pockets? Surely you don’t picture a colourful sunlit room with half a dozen tiny witnesses, the person on the other end of the knife a young boy. But that’s what happened five years ago at my summer internship. Continue reading “The little boy with the knife”

Spotting Signs: Identifying mental health struggle in others

article-pictureEarlier this week I posted about the workshop I attended on mental health in students, where we discussed the distinction between mental health difficulties and mental wellbeing and how they make up our overall mental state. Now, when mental state is poor, it can impact a person’s functioning and will often manifest in hints and signs. Spotting these signs, both major and minor, in oneself or ones’ peers can be crucial for improving the situation. Continue reading “Spotting Signs: Identifying mental health struggle in others”

What’s going on in your head: Mental health difficulties vs mental wellbeing

Student Minds
Student Minds, which ran the workshop, also has a blog!

Within the UK, 29% of university students experience clinical levels of psychological distress and NUS surveys reveal that 78% experience difficulties with mental health. Despite this, only 15 out of every 1000 students disclose these difficulties to their institution. For University Mental Health Day I attended a workshop that focused on identifying and addressing these difficulties in student groups. And the first objective was to help them distinguish between mental health difficulties and mental wellbeing. Continue reading “What’s going on in your head: Mental health difficulties vs mental wellbeing”

Family involvement versus ethical practice

Header.png

My first intensive clinical placement was for three months in the psychiatric department of a government hospital in Pakistan. I had just completed my bachelor’s, ignoring all the jokes about how I was becoming a ‘whitewashed’ psychologist. Regardless, I was still thrust into a form of culture shock when the placement began. Continue reading “Family involvement versus ethical practice”