“How can I change?”: A South Asian carer’s story

Carer 2Over samosas and mithai, for a standard case study, an elderly South Asian woman narrated her experience as sole carer for her husband who had dementia. Her story was rife with cultural abuse that is mitigated under the guise of cultural sensitivity, while culture is ignored where it’s truly needed. I’ve spoken about culture and how it’s caused harm in previous clinical work but I still advocate for cultural sensitivity in healthcare, accommodating cultural beliefs even when they seem antiquated. Why should anyone endure shame, offense or distress to access services? Cultural sensitivity ensures they don’t and improves lives. But can it also hurt them? Continue reading

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Book Review: The Skeleton Cupboard

20170509_190139I promised to review this book so let’s start by asking “Who is The Skeleton Cupboard for?” Hyperbole aside it is a must read for every aspiring psychologist, meriting a place on our undergraduate reading lists and if clinical psychology is your calling its contents will have you salivating:

“I first became fascinated by the frontal lobes of the human brain when I saw my grandmother’s sprayed across the skirting board…” Continue reading

The little boy with the knife

can-stock-photo_csp12353142Five years ago, in a colourful sunlit room with half a dozen tiny witnesses a young boy pulled a knife out on me. It was at my summer internship at a practice that treated children, where I was dedicated to Danial, a boy of nine who was built like a tank, dressed like a golfer and acted like a mafia boss. His diagnosis was ADHD and it had insidiously crept into his life until he was failing at school, misunderstood in a joint family and scraped and bruised from his antics. He came to us to deal with his symptoms and we were left with a hurricane torpedoing through our rooms, leaving us spent in the July heat. Continue reading

Spotting Signs: Identifying mental health struggle in others

article-pictureEarlier this week I posted about the workshop I attended on mental health in students, where we discussed the distinction between mental health difficulties and mental wellbeing and how they make up our overall mental state. Now, when mental state is poor, it can impact a person’s functioning and will often manifest in hints and signs. Spotting these signs, both major and minor, in oneself or ones’ peers can be crucial for improving the situation. Continue reading