Book Review: The Skeleton Cupboard

20170509_190139I promised to review this book so let’s start by asking “Who is The Skeleton Cupboard for?” Hyperbole aside it is a must read for every aspiring psychologist, meriting a place on our undergraduate reading lists and if clinical psychology is your calling its contents will have you salivating:

“I first became fascinated by the frontal lobes of the human brain when I saw my grandmother’s sprayed across the skirting board…” Continue reading

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Spotting Signs: Identifying mental health struggle in others

article-pictureEarlier this week I posted about the workshop I attended on mental health in students, where we discussed the distinction between mental health difficulties and mental wellbeing and how they make up our overall mental state. Now, when mental state is poor, it can impact a person’s functioning and will often manifest in hints and signs. Spotting these signs, both major and minor, in oneself or ones’ peers can be crucial for improving the situation. Continue reading

What’s going on in your head: Mental health difficulties vs mental wellbeing

Student Minds

Student Minds, which ran the workshop, also has a blog!

Within the UK, 29% of university students experience clinical levels of psychological distress and NUS surveys reveal that 78% experience difficulties with mental health. Despite this, only 15 out of every 1000 students disclose these difficulties to their institution. For University Mental Health Day I attended a workshop that focused on identifying and addressing these difficulties in student groups. And the first objective was to help them distinguish between mental health difficulties and mental wellbeing. Continue reading

Introductions: Inviting an Audience

20170220_094400.jpgSince childhood I was a voracious reader and decided early on that one day it had to be my words gracing a novel’s pages. Therefore, I brought forth to my father, a matter-of-fact man, that I wanted to be a writer. In not so many words he said “Sure. Just don’t expect it to pay the bills”. I was five at the time and guessed this would not do so the quest to find a path that would ‘pay the bills’ began. Continue reading